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Extinction Rebellion founder Roger Hallam slams ‘urban middle-class neo-liberal Left’ behind Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ expansion and condemns scheme as ‘intrusive’ and ‘regressive’ for lowest-paid Londoners


Extinction Rebellion founder Roger Hallam slams ‘urban middle-class neo-liberal Left’ behind Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ expansion and condemns scheme as ‘intrusive’ and ‘regressive’ for lowest-paid Londoners

  • Roger Hallam citicised ‘urban middle class neo-liberal left’ supporters of ULEZ
  • He said it has enraged ‘those who work hard to provide our basic services’

The founder of Extinction Rebellion has slammed Sadiq Khan‘s ULEZ scheme for being ‘intrusive’ and ‘regressive’ for some of the lowest-paid workers in London.  

Roger Hallam posted on the social media site X taking aim at the ‘urban middle class neo-liberal left’ supporters of the much hated scheme which is due to come into force later this month. 

He said that the scheme was enraging ‘those who work hard to provide our basic services’ and whose job it is to drive around parts of greater London.

Hallam also highlighted that critics of the scheme ‘want to sort out climate and pollution as much as anyone else’, while supporters show a ‘total lack of sensitivity and self awareness’. 

His comments came hours before several vehicles had their tyres punctured in Bromley during an anti-ULEZ protest that had to be handled by police.

The founder of Extinction Rebellion, Roger Hallam (pictured), has slammed Sadiq Khan’s ULEZ scheme for being ‘intrusive’ and ‘regressive’ 

He took aim at the 'urban middke class neo-liberal left' policy makers behind the London Mayor's (pictured) much hated scheme

He took aim at the ‘urban middke class neo-liberal left’ policy makers behind the London Mayor’s (pictured) much hated scheme 

A man was pictured taking out a flat tyre and replacing it after a pro-ULEZ protester put holes in the wheels of his van

A man was pictured taking out a flat tyre and replacing it after a pro-ULEZ protester put holes in the wheels of his van 

Several vehicles had their tyres punctured in Bromley on Saturday during an anti-ULEZ protest that had to be handled by police

Several vehicles had their tyres punctured in Bromley on Saturday during an anti-ULEZ protest that had to be handled by police

This map shows how the ULEZ area is due to be dramatically expanded from next month

This map shows how the ULEZ area is due to be dramatically expanded from next month

Hallam was responding to an article in the Guardian by Professor Devi Sridhar where she argued in favour of ULEZ and low-traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) as they can help to ‘save lives’. 

He said: ‘Let’s be totally clear here, the most lives would be saved by taxing the richest 1% (like the city traders and lawyers who fund and facilitate 15% of global emissions), and subjecting them to carbon rationing.

‘This tax could easily fund the change over to non polluting vehicles without people being out of pocket. 

‘But of course nothing is said about that in the article – and nothing will be said by @MayorofLondon about it either.’

Hallam added: ‘Those who suffer the regressive, intrusive policies of #ULEZ want to sort climate and pollution as much as anyone else. 

‘And that would become clear in 5 minutes if they were allowed a voice, and thus felt like they were being listened to. 

‘The urban middle class neo-liberal left don’t understand this and that’s why they are hated – for their hypocrisy, their arrogance.’

Just hours after Hallam spoke out a number of cars which formed part of a convoy that were parked along a road in Bromley during a protest were targeted – with at least 15 tyres from seven vehicles reportedly punctured.

One man was pictured taking out a flat tyre and replacing it after a pro-ULEZ protester put holes in the wheels of a van.

Hallam was responding to an article in the Gurdian by Professor Devi Sridhar where she argued in favour of ULEZ and low-traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) as they can help to 'save lives'

Hallam was responding to an article in the Gurdian by Professor Devi Sridhar where she argued in favour of ULEZ and low-traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) as they can help to ‘save lives’

Cars part of the convoy that were parked along a road in the Greater London town were targeted - with at least 15 tyres from seven vehicles reportedly punctured

Cars part of the convoy that were parked along a road in the Greater London town were targeted – with at least 15 tyres from seven vehicles reportedly punctured

One man can be seen holding up a sign saying 'ULEZ creates poverty' while others hold signs criticising Sadiq Khan

One man can be seen holding up a sign saying ‘ULEZ creates poverty’ while others hold signs criticising Sadiq Khan 

People in Bromley were seen holding up protest signs reading 'Khant pay, won't pay' and 'stop the toxic air life' as they set out to put a halt to the environmental scheme

People in Bromley were seen holding up protest signs reading ‘Khant pay, won’t pay’ and ‘stop the toxic air life’ as they set out to put a halt to the environmental scheme

Protestors in Bromley were seen holding up signs reading ‘Khant pay, won’t pay’ and ‘stop the toxic air life’ as they set out to put a halt to the environmental scheme. 

Police were seen trying to control the situation as angry protesters paraded down the town’s streets.

The ULEZ expansion will come into force in a few weeks and will require Londoners to pay £12.50-a-day to drive in Greater London if their cars do not meet certain environmental standards.

Khan previously refused to ‘water down’ the ULEZ green tax expansion after he announced he was increasing grants for families to replace non-compliant older, larger cars with less polluting models to £2,000.

Despite his efforts to make the scheme more feasible for drivers during the cost of living crisis, Khan was criticised by Tories including Health Minister Maria Caulfield, who warned it would do little to help with the cost of a replacement.



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